Agum. Polaroid digital collage. #afrian #art #collage #personalwork

@chindaddy Toronto 2013 shot on my Rolleiflex 2.8D I used TRI-X 400 #film #ishootfilm #filmisnotdeadtoras

Version #1 and the f’n glossy paper at the top got peeled off!!! #artistproofnow

3 seconds will do! #testprint

Aesop – The Lion and the Eagle

AN EAGLE stayed his flight and entreated a Lion to make an alliance with him to their mutual advantage. The Lion replied, “I have no objection, but you must excuse me for requiring you to find surety for your good faith, for how can I trust anyone as a friend who is able to fly away from his bargain whenever he pleases?’ Try before you trust.

vintageblackglamour:

Gordon Parks in Venice, Italy, listening to a recording of the rehearsal for the concerto he composed, which was performed in Venice in July 1952. Pictured with Mr. Parks are the renowned conductor Dean Dixon and his wife, Mary Mandelin, a Finnish playwright. Photo by James Whitmore//Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.

I got work to do

(via soulbrotherv2)

soulbrotherv2:

Barbie who? Nigeria’s Queens of Africa dolls take on US toymaker Mattel
Local entrepreneur makes black dolls to fill gap in African market, as economists predict consumer boom for Nigeria

With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed when he could not find a black doll for his niece.
The 43-year-old spotted a gap in the market and, with little competition from foreign firms such as Mattel Inc, the maker of Barbie, he set up his own business. He outsourced manufacturing of doll parts to low-cost China, assembled them onshore and added a twist – traditional Nigerian costumes.
Seven years on, Okoya sells between 6,000 and 9,000 of his Queens of Africa and Naija Princesses a month, and reckons he has 10-15% of a small but fast-growing market.
[Continue to The Guardian to read Mr. Okoya’s story in its entirety.]
soulbrotherv2:

Barbie who? Nigeria’s Queens of Africa dolls take on US toymaker Mattel
Local entrepreneur makes black dolls to fill gap in African market, as economists predict consumer boom for Nigeria

With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed when he could not find a black doll for his niece.
The 43-year-old spotted a gap in the market and, with little competition from foreign firms such as Mattel Inc, the maker of Barbie, he set up his own business. He outsourced manufacturing of doll parts to low-cost China, assembled them onshore and added a twist – traditional Nigerian costumes.
Seven years on, Okoya sells between 6,000 and 9,000 of his Queens of Africa and Naija Princesses a month, and reckons he has 10-15% of a small but fast-growing market.
[Continue to The Guardian to read Mr. Okoya’s story in its entirety.]

soulbrotherv2:

Barbie who? Nigeria’s Queens of Africa dolls take on US toymaker Mattel

Local entrepreneur makes black dolls to fill gap in African market, as economists predict consumer boom for Nigeria

With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed when he could not find a black doll for his niece.

The 43-year-old spotted a gap in the market and, with little competition from foreign firms such as Mattel Inc, the maker of Barbie, he set up his own business. He outsourced manufacturing of doll parts to low-cost China, assembled them onshore and added a twist – traditional Nigerian costumes.

Seven years on, Okoya sells between 6,000 and 9,000 of his Queens of Africa and Naija Princesses a month, and reckons he has 10-15% of a small but fast-growing market.

[Continue to The Guardian to read Mr. Okoya’s story in its entirety.]

Shout outs to Gordon Parks getting shown in class.

thepoisonprose:

A response to “Cry Me a River, Kanye!” by Rachel Décoste

On a day when people throughout North America recognized the struggles, sacrifices and accomplishments of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., Rachel Décoste set her sights on hip-hop. The software engineer Décoste, who…

Manning. #GoBroncos. #SuperBowl #FanFromTime

Shooting for the love of shooting. Fin-ally! Lawd! Thanks @_heynani

“We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn’t matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too. If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn’t matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.”
— Langston Hughes, The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain (via millionen)

(via waynelawrence)

Mouna @_heynani #blackfashion